family documentary

By Michael Drumm

   An effective family documentary will not only honor the family, and its ancestral roots, but it will also strike an emotional cord. As a filmmaker, that is one of the most important goals – to evoke an emotional response! I look at making a film as an opportunity to use the many production values available to a Director to do just that. It is the magic of the combined total of all the elements that are in a movie that helps trigger someones emotions, and how deeply.
 

   Just one such production value is camera motion. To have a shot actually be moving through space with its compositional focus being consistently and properly aligned creates visual “poetry”.  Today, achieving this kind of movement has gotten less obtrusive to execute due to the shrinking nature of HD capture technology. Wedding videos and movies particularly benefit from motion.

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Here, we see the traditional film camera dolly that very much still has a place in cinematic production  Suffice to say, the more appropriate movement, the better!
The explosion of ancestry.com proves the interest in exploring  family roots. Now, work with Homage Films and myself to take your story, and utilize powerful production value techniques to create some family magic!


 

by Michael Drumm

Go deep into your families history

Ethel-family documentary

A great family movie transcends the normal limitations of “sharing” about ones family. It can create a strong emotional impact that can touch even those who don’t know the family. There is a lot that goes into that equation.

 Recently, HBO ran the documentary “Ethel” the piece on Ethel Kennedy, done by her daughter Rory. Regardless of politics, this piece is very well done.Through the interviews in the piece, a powerful narrative is carried. The large amount of archival materials available also makes it historically rich. 

  A strong prototype for us to strive for here at Homage Films.  Family ancestry deserves to be documented in a special way. Web sites like ancestry.com are showing the wave of interest that exists from families in exploring their family and documenting family roots.  When we take on a family project, we can elevate that story into a powerful historical document worthy of the family name.